Dyslexia and workplace discrimination | Dyslexia UK

Dyslexia and workplace discrimination

January 22, 2024 Keir Williams Comments Off

Dyslexia is a learning difficulty that affects a person’s ability to read, write and spell. It is a neurological condition that is estimated to affect around 10% of the population to varying degrees. Dyslexia is often misunderstood and can lead to discrimination in the workplace. However, there are laws in place to protect people with dyslexia from discrimination and to ensure that they receive support to enable them to perform their jobs effectively.

Employment discrimination

Employment discrimination against people with dyslexia can take many forms. It could be direct discrimination, where someone is treated unfairly because of their dyslexia, or indirect discrimination, where a company has a policy that puts dyslexic people at a disadvantage. For example, a company might have a policy that requires all employees to fill out a written test as part of the recruitment process, which could discriminate against people with dyslexia.

There is also the issue of harassment, which is defined as unwanted conduct related to a person’s dyslexia that has the purpose or effect of violating their dignity or creating an intimidating, hostile, degrading, humiliating or offensive environment for them. This could include offensive comments or jokes about a person’s dyslexia, or a failure to make reasonable adjustments that could help them perform their job effectively.

Reasonable adjustments

Reasonable adjustments are changes that an employer can make to remove any barriers that might prevent a person with dyslexia from performing their job effectively. The Equality Act (2010) requires all employers to make reasonable adjustments for people with disabilities, including dyslexia.

Reasonable adjustments could include providing software that converts text to speech, using different coloured paper or backgrounds to help with reading, or allowing extra time for tasks or tests. It is important to note that reasonable adjustments should not be seen as special treatment, but rather as a way of ensuring that people with dyslexia are able to perform their jobs to the best of their ability.

Access to Work scheme

The Access to Work scheme is a government initiative that provides financial assistance to employers to help them make reasonable adjustments for employees with disabilities, including dyslexia. This could include funding for software, equipment or training.

If an employer fails to make reasonable adjustments for an employee with dyslexia, the employee may be able to take legal action through an employment tribunal. This can be a stressful and time-consuming process for all involved, so it is usually better for the parties to settle the issue before it goes to tribunal.

To read about SEN and dyslexia legislation here: https://www.dyslexiauk.co.uk/sen-legislation-and-statutory-requirements/

For more information on workplace assessments, read this post: https://www.dyslexiauk.co.uk/workplace-assessments/

To speak to a dyslexia assessor, contact us: https://www.dyslexiauk.co.uk/#request-form  

Dyslexia and workplace discrimination

Dyslexia is a learning difficulty that affects a person’s ability to read, write and spell. It is a neurological condition that is estimated to affect around 10% of the population to varying degrees. Dyslexia is often misunderstood and can lead to discrimination in the workplace. However, there are laws in place to protect people with dyslexia from discrimination and to ensure that they receive support to enable them to perform their jobs effectively.

Employment discrimination

Employment discrimination against people with dyslexia can take many forms. It could be direct discrimination, where someone is treated unfairly because of their dyslexia, or indirect discrimination, where a company has a policy that puts dyslexic people at a disadvantage. For example, a company might have a policy that requires all employees to fill out a written test as part of the recruitment process, which could discriminate against people with dyslexia.

There is also the issue of harassment, which is defined as unwanted conduct related to a person’s dyslexia that has the purpose or effect of violating their dignity or creating an intimidating, hostile, degrading, humiliating or offensive environment for them. This could include offensive comments or jokes about a person’s dyslexia, or a failure to make reasonable adjustments that could help them perform their job effectively.

Reasonable adjustments

Reasonable adjustments are changes that an employer can make to remove any barriers that might prevent a person with dyslexia from performing their job effectively. The Equality Act (2010) requires all employers to make reasonable adjustments for people with disabilities, including dyslexia.

Reasonable adjustments could include providing software that converts text to speech, using different coloured paper or backgrounds to help with reading, or allowing extra time for tasks or tests. It is important to note that reasonable adjustments should not be seen as special treatment, but rather as a way of ensuring that people with dyslexia are able to perform their jobs to the best of their ability.

Access to Work scheme

The Access to Work scheme is a government initiative that provides financial assistance to employers to help them make reasonable adjustments for employees with disabilities, including dyslexia. This could include funding for software, equipment or training.

If an employer fails to make reasonable adjustments for an employee with dyslexia, the employee may be able to take legal action through an employment tribunal. This can be a stressful and time-consuming process for all involved, so it is usually better for the parties to settle the issue before it goes to tribunal.

To read about SEN and dyslexia legislation here: https://www.dyslexiauk.co.uk/sen-legislation-and-statutory-requirements/

For more information on workplace assessments, read this post: https://www.dyslexiauk.co.uk/workplace-assessments/

To speak to a dyslexia assessor, contact us: https://www.dyslexiauk.co.uk/#request-form